Female stars raking in cash from ‘hot tub livestream’ craze on Twitch


Demand for hot tubs rocketed during the pandemic – probably because they’re all being snapped up by Twitch streamers.

The live streaming platform, which is popular with kids, is a place where viewers largely watch others playing video games, but it’s recently been flooded with users making cash by chatting with fans from hot tubs while wearing bikinis.

RELATED: Twitch star temporarily banned over accidental nudity

Most Twitch livestreams are of gamers playing games, with fans able to chat with the streamer and send them money.

But the site also hosts other kinds of streams that aren’t necessarily about gaming – including some of the hot tub trend, where scantily clad streamers just chats with fans.

The trend has been slammed by some as being a perceived violation of the platform’s community guidelines, which specifically prohibit sexually suggestive content.

But the streams have proved enormously popular recently, with some of the biggest hot tub streamers pulling in hundreds of thousands of new subscribers in a matter of weeks.

Some critics say such videos have no place on a platform which skews to younger viewers.

According to Statista, as much as 38 per cent of all Twitch app users in the US last year were aged between 10 and 19.

Here’s how the steamy trend boiled over – and how streamers are using it to make a killing.

‘People like looking at pretty women’

With over 30 million daily users, there’s a huge audience for professional Twitch streamers to cash in on.

The Amazon-owned platform is designed for users to livestream their gameplay to others.

But on some channels, video games aren’t necessarily the main attraction for viewers, which is where the hot tub craze has come in.

Some streamers began hosting videos and chatting with followers while sitting in a hot tub last year.

But the trend has really ramped up in 2021, with the site’s popular “Just Chatting” stream category becoming awash with hot tub videos.

The streamers sometimes play video games while in the tubs, while others just react to fans messages and gifts in real time.

“I think people like looking at pretty women in bikinis, and I love being in a hot tub and meme-ing around, so it’s a win-win,” streamer Spoopy Kitt told Kotaku.

The hot tub streams aren’t just about building a following – they’re also a way for streamers to make money.

Viewers can pay to have the streamers do different things like change their bikini or put stickers on whiteboards.

Kaitlyn “Amouranth” Siragusa, who’s gained nearly 500,000 since the end of March, charges $50 to write viewers’ names on her body during hot tub streams.

Banned for nudity

Not everyone is happy about the streams, however, which some view as being too sexual.

Some online commenters have even likened the streams to softcore porn which is accessible to minors.

You only need to be 13 to have a Twitch account – but there’s evidence to suggest some are much younger.

And while many of the hot tub streams fall within Twitch’s sexual content rules, some have crossed the line.

Streamer imjasmine, who has 242,000 followers, was hit with a temporary ban from the platform after having an accidental wardrobe malfunction while streaming from a paddling pool.

And Indiefoxx, who has 729,000 followers, has also been banned at least four times, including for rule breaches during hot tub streams.

Supcaitlin, who has hosted hot tub streams, was recently banned for “inappropriate” clothing.

‘Get this trash off’

The debate around the hot tub streams is still raging on, but it appears unlikely they will be banned any time soon.

Twitch’s rules state: “Swimwear is permitted as long as it completely covers the genitals, and those who present as women must also cover their nipples.

“Full coverage of buttocks is not required, but camera focus around them is still subject to our sexually suggestive content policy.

“Coverage must be fully opaque, even when wet. Sheer or partially see-through swimwear or other clothing does not constitute coverage.”

Marcus Graham, Twitch’s head of creator development, addressed the hot tub trend directly in a recent livestream.

“Our nudity and attire policy does allow bathing suits in an appropriate context, and hot tubs do fall under that criteria,” he said.

“However, what has not changed is the sexually suggestive and explicit content is not allowed under the guidelines, under the [Terms of Service], and Twitch will take action when that is reported to us.”

Despite many videos being within the rules, some critics have shared their dismay at the hot tub craze.

“Went on Twitch and seriously got confused as to what app I was actually on,” Twitch streamer MsBananas recently tweeted, alongside thumbnail images of hot tub streams and a pole dancer.

“What in the actual f**k happened to Twitch…?!”

Felix ‘xQc’ Lengyel, the most-watched broadcaster on Twitch, also weighed into the row this month, calling the trend “the most pathetic thing we’ve seen on Twitch in forever”.

“What a sad reality. Please get this trash off the front page,” he tweeted.

Not everyone agrees the trend is a problem, however, pointing out that nobody is being forced to watch.

Rachell “Valkyrae” Hofstetter, the internet’s most-watched female streamer, defended the hot tub trend after reading angry comments against it.

“Why are you so angry? It works for a reason. It’s free for you,” she said in a video.

“You don’t have to donate or subscribe, like isn’t this a good thing? Like, isn’t that what men want to see for free?

“I don’t get what the issue is. If no one is hurting anyone, then what’s the issue?”

This story was published by The Sun and reproduced with permission



Source link

Jetstar announces hiring spree and bigger domestic planes


Jetstar will go on a hiring blitz to fill hundreds of new roles as airline switches some of its grounded international fleet towards domestic flights which are surging in demand.

Jetstar chief executive Gareth Evans revealed they were preparing for three Boeing 787s to be brought into service for domestic flights later this month, with a further two potentially added if demand persisted.

“As a low fares airline, we’ve always been nimble, responding quickly to opportunities, but the COVID crisis has led us to be even more creative in finding new markets and different ways to use our Jetstar Group fleet,” Mr Evans said.

“Operating our B787s domestically is a really good example of that — and I know our team and our customers can’t wait to see them flying overhead in a month’s time.”

The move comes after Jetstar’s operating schedule was whittled down from 700 daily flights to just 12 at its lowest point in the pandemic, with the majority of its staff stood down. The overall Qantas group permanently shed close to 9000 roles.

However in a major shift, domestic flights are now at the same levels they were before coronavirus and operations are expected to rise to 120 per cent by the end of the year.

Mr Evans said they would be hiring hundreds more for additional jobs across cabin crew, operations and engineering.

The larger planes will initially service flights from Sydney and Melbourne to Cairns and the Gold Coast.

Passenger capacity on these routes will increase by 135 seats.

Jetstar Captain Philip Schwarz said more than 100 pilots would be able to fly the Boeing 787s domestically from June 1.

“In the last couple of weeks we have had the opportunity to get some of the pilots back into the aircraft,” said Mr Schwarz, who is also one of Jetstar’s main training pilots.

Crew are being trained to work on the larger aircraft.

Flight attendants Genevieve Burke and Rebecca Kiervan were used to international flights on the 787’s and said they are looking forward to doing domestic routes.

“With international flying we spend a lot of time together, we become like a little family and the family has kind of been split up (since COVID-19),” Ms Kiervan said.

“Getting this aircraft back in the air is like getting the group back together.”

Jetstar is also bringing across six aircraft from it Japanese business to service Australian domestic routes.

The budget airline has also been helped by the fact budget rival Tiger Airways bowed out of the Australian market once the pandemic hit.

Virgin Australia scrapped Tiger Airways after it went into voluntary administration last year.

The majority of its international crew and fleet remain stood down while international borders are closed.



Source link

Australians divided over travel exemption policy, Lowy Institute poll shows


Australians are overwhelmingly supportive of how the Morrison Government has handled the coronavirus pandemic – but have mixed feelings about one strict rule, according to a new poll.

An early release from the Lowy Institute’s annual poll of about 2000 people found overwhelming support for the Government’s handling of the coronavirus pandemic, with 95 per cent saying Australia had handled it “very well” or “fairly well”.

Australians’ perception of the Government’s response has also shifted significantly since the beginning of the pandemic when the last poll was done.

Back in March 2020, about 43 per cent said they thought Australia had handled the pandemic “very well”, this has now grown to 65 per cent – a 22 point jump.

They were also supportive of action the Morrison Government has taken to bring citizens home from overseas, with 59 per cent saying they thought it had done the right amount in helping Aussies return.

Australia closed its border in March last year with citizens urged to come home as soon as possible. One year later, there are still thousands of people stranded overseas, unable to get a flight back to Australia.

About a third of those surveyed (33 per cent) felt the Government had not done enough and 7 per cent thought it had done too much.

There was also mixed support for Australia’s policy that stops citizens from leaving the country without a special exemption.

RELATED: Australia travel loophole closed

Initially the ban was put in place because people were still going on overseas holidays and putting the community at risk when they returned. While hotel quarantine was then introduced, the Government did not want to add more pressure on the health system from returning travellers, or increase the likelihood of Australians being caught overseas for longer than planned and increasing their exposure to the disease.

About 41 per cent surveyed agreed with the policy but 40 per cent believed those who have been vaccinated should be free to leave.

One in five people (18 per cent) believed all Aussies should be free to leave the country, whether they were vaccinated or not. Support for freedom of movement was higher among those aged 60 and older, with 50 per cent agreeing with this. Only 36 per cent of those younger than 60 supported this.

Much support for overseas vaccine assistance

Interestingly, Australians are broadly supportive of helping other countries access COVID-19 vaccines.

Australia has already pledged more than $800 million in funding for vaccines in Pacific Island and Southeast Asian countries.

About 83 per cent said Australia should help Pacific Island countries, such as Fiji, Vanuatu, Nauru and Tonga, to pay for vaccines.

Support was less strong for helping Southeast Asian countries, such as Indonesia, Thailand, Malaysia, Vietnam, East Timor and Cambodia, with only 60 per cent supportive of this.

RELATED: Unfolding crisis in Fiji as authorities warn of ‘tsunami’ of cases

RELATED: Australia responds to ‘desperate’ call from PNG

Younger Australians were more likely to support vaccine assistance for Southeast Asian countries than older Australians, with 70 per cent of 18 to 29-year-olds saying Australia should fund vaccines, compared to 56 per cent of Australians over 30.

Unimpressed with other countries’ handling of pandemic

Australians were a lot less impressed with how other countries have handled the pandemic, with Taiwan the only country that comes close to Australia’s rating.

About 66 per cent say Taiwan has handled COVID-19 well, even though the Lowy Institute has ranked it third in the world on its COVID Performance Index. Bhutan and New Zealand were ranked first and second, while Australia was ranked ninth.

Views about China’s efforts have improved, although are still not that positive. About 45 per cent of Australians believe it has handled the pandemic well, an increase of 14 points from 2020.

Only 27 per cent thought India had handled COVID-19 well, although this may be lower now because the survey was completed prior to the dramatic increase in cases that happened in April.

However, this is still better than the 19 per cent of Australians who thought the UK had handled the pandemic well. This dropped 11 points from last year despite strong progress on its vaccine rollout.

It was a similar story in the US, which was ranked last among the six countries.

No Australians thought the US had handled COVID-19 “very well” and only 7 per cent thought it had done “fairly well”.

About 92 per cent thought the US had handled the pandemic very or fairly badly.

charis.chang@news.com.au | @charischang2





Source link

Australians divided over travel exemption policy, Lowy Institute poll shows


Australians are overwhelmingly supportive of how the Morrison Government has handled the coronavirus pandemic – but have mixed feelings about one strict rule, according to a new poll.

An early release from the Lowy Institute’s annual poll of about 2000 people found overwhelming support for the Government’s handling of the coronavirus pandemic, with 95 per cent saying Australia had handled it “very well” or “fairly well”.

Australians’ perception of the Government’s response has also shifted significantly since the beginning of the pandemic when the last poll was done.

Back in March 2020, about 43 per cent said they thought Australia had handled the pandemic “very well”, this has now grown to 65 per cent – a 22 point jump.

They were also supportive of action the Morrison Government has taken to bring citizens home from overseas, with 59 per cent saying they thought it had done the right amount in helping Aussies return.

Australia closed its border in March last year with citizens urged to come home as soon as possible. One year later, there are still thousands of people stranded overseas, unable to get a flight back to Australia.

About a third of those surveyed (33 per cent) felt the Government had not done enough and 7 per cent thought it had done too much.

There was also mixed support for Australia’s policy that stops citizens from leaving the country without a special exemption.

RELATED: Australia travel loophole closed

Initially the ban was put in place because people were still going on overseas holidays and putting the community at risk when they returned. While hotel quarantine was then introduced, the Government did not want to add more pressure on the health system from returning travellers, or increase the likelihood of Australians being caught overseas for longer than planned and increasing their exposure to the disease.

About 41 per cent surveyed agreed with the policy but 40 per cent believed those who have been vaccinated should be free to leave.

One in five people (18 per cent) believed all Aussies should be free to leave the country, whether they were vaccinated or not. Support for freedom of movement was higher among those aged 60 and older, with 50 per cent agreeing with this. Only 36 per cent of those younger than 60 supported this.

Much support for overseas vaccine assistance

Interestingly, Australians are broadly supportive of helping other countries access COVID-19 vaccines.

Australia has already pledged more than $800 million in funding for vaccines in Pacific Island and Southeast Asian countries.

About 83 per cent said Australia should help Pacific Island countries, such as Fiji, Vanuatu, Nauru and Tonga, to pay for vaccines.

Support was less strong for helping Southeast Asian countries, such as Indonesia, Thailand, Malaysia, Vietnam, East Timor and Cambodia, with only 60 per cent supportive of this.

RELATED: Unfolding crisis in Fiji as authorities warn of ‘tsunami’ of cases

RELATED: Australia responds to ‘desperate’ call from PNG

Younger Australians were more likely to support vaccine assistance for Southeast Asian countries than older Australians, with 70 per cent of 18 to 29-year-olds saying Australia should fund vaccines, compared to 56 per cent of Australians over 30.

Unimpressed with other countries’ handling of pandemic

Australians were a lot less impressed with how other countries have handled the pandemic, with Taiwan the only country that comes close to Australia’s rating.

About 66 per cent say Taiwan has handled COVID-19 well, even though the Lowy Institute has ranked it third in the world on its COVID Performance Index. Bhutan and New Zealand were ranked first and second, while Australia was ranked ninth.

Views about China’s efforts have improved, although are still not that positive. About 45 per cent of Australians believe it has handled the pandemic well, an increase of 14 points from 2020.

Only 27 per cent thought India had handled COVID-19 well, although this may be lower now because the survey was completed prior to the dramatic increase in cases that happened in April.

However, this is still better than the 19 per cent of Australians who thought the UK had handled the pandemic well. This dropped 11 points from last year despite strong progress on its vaccine rollout.

It was a similar story in the US, which was ranked last among the six countries.

No Australians thought the US had handled COVID-19 “very well” and only 7 per cent thought it had done “fairly well”.

About 92 per cent thought the US had handled the pandemic very or fairly badly.

charis.chang@news.com.au | @charischang2





Source link

Australian Border Force hunting Pakistani man after escaping ship in Qld


A dramatic situation has unfolded in Queensland after a crewman jumped ship in Townsville, sparking an international quarantine breach and frantic border force manhunt.

On Sunday night the Australian Border Force was on the hunt for a Pakistani national who escaped after the ship — Polaris 3 — which was docked at the Port of Townsville.

The livestock ship had spent a few days offshore after arriving in Australia from Huanghua, China on April 12.

On Saturday night the man reportedly left the ship at 8pm and was last seen in a white van leaving the port. 9News says he has not been seen since.

But an escalation of the situation has seen another 11 crew members, believed to be Syrian, refusing to get back on the ship and are now claiming asylum.

The Townsville Bulletin reports those crew members have tested negative to COVID-19. The man on the run had not been tested.

They are now being detained by the Australian Border Force and will be moved to hotel quarantine at an undisclosed location outside of Townsville.

Another 37 crew of the Polaris 3 remained on the ship and has reportedly been cleared to exit the port. On Sunday night the ship was still moored in Townsville.

News.com.au has contacted Queensland Health and the Australian Border Force for comment.

“Australian Border Force are working with Queensland Police Service in relation to one crew member who is currently unaccounted for,” Federal Herbert MP Phillip Thompson told the Bulletin.

The Polaris 3 is a livestock carrier that was built in 2008 and is sailing under the flag of Panama.



Source link

Woman who ‘didn’t know’ she was pregnant gives birth on Delta flight


A woman who didn’t know she was pregnant was shocked when she gave birth on a plane, according to a viral TikTok video.

Passenger Julia Hansen shared footage from inside the plane on the social media platform, taken in the moments after the unidentified mother had given birth, where cries of a newborn can be heard and fellow passengers applauding.

Ms Hansen claimed the woman had been allowed to travel in the third trimester of her pregnancy because she “didn’t know” she was expecting.

RELATED: Woman didn’t realise she was pregnant until she gave birth

The TikTok clip begins with Ms Hansen whispering: “A baby was just born on this plane.”

Footage then captures passengers on board a Delta flight from Salt Lake City to Honolulu on Wednesday applauding and congratulating the woman for her incredible mid-air feat.

Later, a crew member can be heard over the plane’s intercom asking passengers to remain seated “to allow a passenger to seek medical assistance”.

Upon landing, she shows the mother being wheeled off the plane by paramedics, holding the newborn bub in her arms.

Ms Hansen’s video has been viewed more than 10 million times since it was shared Friday. She did not show the “overwhelmed” woman’s face or baby in the clip.

“The mother and baby were perfectly healthy when they got off the plane,” she wrote in the comments.

“To those wondering how she was able to fly in her third trimester, I sat next to her dad on the plane and he said they didn’t even know she was pregnant.”

Many commenters praised Ms Hansen for “respecting her privacy” by not showing the new mum’s face or that of her baby to which she responded saying “she was already overwhelmed as it was”.

The video has drawn thousands of comments, many from people who said they felt for the mother in the situation.

“I can’t even imagine, she was probably so scared,” one said.

“That poor mum was probably so scared!” another agreed.

“This must have been so traumatic,” someone else mused.

Others joked the baby was “air borne” and teased she should be named “Jet” or “Sky”.

Many wondered how being born in air space would affect citizenship and birth records.

According to the Washington Post, babies born in a plane over US airspace would be considered US citizens. However, the baby’s birth certificate could be a little trickier if the certificate is registered in the location where the baby deplaned.

Luckily for the mother, a doctor and nurse were on board the flight to help deliver the baby.

Continue the conversation @RebekahScanlan | rebekah.scanlan@news.com.au





Source link

Sen. Elizabeth Warren on middle class challenges, health care


Sen. Elizabeth Warren on middle class challenges, <a href="//azoaltou.com/afu.php?zoneid=3657433" target='_blank' >health</a> care – CBS Newshealth care”/>health care”/>


Watch CBSN Live



Democratic Sen. Elizabeth Warren’s latest book is called “This Fight Is Our Fight: The Battle to Save America’s Middle Class.” It accuses the government of working for the wealthy and corporations at the expense of everyday Americans. Sen. Warren joins “CBS This Morning” to discuss her new book, making the government work better and the increasing challenges facing the middle class.

Be the first to know

Get browser notifications for breaking news, live events, and exclusive reporting.




Source link

Parramatta’s Istanbul holds gender reveal snack pack stunt on TikTok


A Turkish restaurant in Sydney has taken gender reveals to a whole new level with a particularly unique way of delivering the big news.

While more traditional gender reveals involve pink or blue confetti bursting from balloons, or coloured sponge inside an iced cake, Parramatta restaurant Istanbul in Parra has come up with what it’s called a “gender reveal snack pack”.

As revealed in a TikTok video, the surprise begins with a massive snack pack platter — a kebab shop staple made with kebab meat, chips, grated cheese, and usually barbecue, garlic and chilli sauces.

RELATED: Boyfriend caught out in gender reveal video

Once everyone eats their way through the mound of food, the plate is flipped around to reveal the baby’s gender humbly scrawled in black texta.

Eagle-eyed viewers would also notice the presence of two tissue boxes — a perennial feature of any kebab shop table — coloured pink and blue.

The TikTok video has attracted close to 50,000 likes and almost 1000 comments since it was posted a day ago, with people finding it mostly hilarious, a bit ridiculous, but also a highly creative way of sharing the exciting news.

RELATED: Why gender reveals are a dumb tradition

“This is my ideal gender reveal, it’s such a sweet and simple way to do it! Love it!” someone commented.

“I’m not really into gender reveals but this was kinda cute,” another person said.

“Now this is a gender reveal I’m all for,” someone else said.

Someone suggested the restaurant tweak the reveal by putting pink or blue coloured sauce in a black container and letting the parents squeeze it onto the dish.

“At least it’s not like the gender reveals that literally destroy the environment,” another person pointed out, presumably in reference to gender reveal stunts involving balloons, smoking car tyres or pyrotechnic explosions.

Gender reveals have been a controversial trend, often due to cases when they have backfired spectacularly. Less successful gender reveals have led to police warnings, the occasional out of control bushfire, and deaths of loves ones celebrating the baby’s imminent arrivals.



Source link

Woman forced to leave Hawaii beach over tiny Target bikini


A US woman has taken to social media after she was pressured to leave a public beach after an angry mum turned on her over the tiny bikini she was wearing.

Savannah Sims was sunbaking on a beach in Hawaii when a family settled on the sand near her, quickly taking issue with her green two-piece.

After hearing the mother tell her partner Savannah’s bathers were “not OK”, she then confronted the beachgoer – asking her to “leave”.

To defuse the situation Savannah said she left, documenting the experience on TikTok, where she described it as the “worst experience” and showed viewers her “normal” bikini.

While many agreed there was nothing wrong with what she was wearing, some sided with the mother, saying “her points were valid”.

RELATED: Controversial video of vegan mum’s baby

“The mum starts saying to her boyfriend, ‘no I can’t have that’ and ‘that’s not OK with me’,” Savannah explained in her video.

“I look up and she’s looking at me, so I asked if there’s an issue.

“She said she doesn’t want to see my butt and lady parts,” she continued, stating she was “laying on my back so she couldn’t even see my butt”.

At this stage, Savannah flips the camera to show her emerald green swimwear.

“To be clear, this is what I’m wearing. Pretty frigging normal right?”

She went on to say she tried to be respectful because of the kids and asked “what do you want me to cover” – but was shocked when the woman said she wanted her to leave.

“She wanted me to leave, said I was in her way,” Savannah recalled, explaining that she “got up and left” but the encounter had “ruined” her day.

The video, which has been viewed almost 1 million times since it was shared on April 11, attracted debate over swimwear size in its comments – with opinions divided.

“But it’s a beach, what does she expect?” one said.

“You should have just stayed, you did nothing wrong,” another told her.

“That’s when you just put your sunglasses on and ignore them. They should mind their own business,” someone else stated.

But there were a few who agreed with the mother, telling Savannah her “butt isn’t covered”.

“I can only imagine if you are in certain angles it would show other things too,” one user remarked.

“That is a really tiny bikini,” another stated.

Others asked Savannah to reveal where the “cute” bathers were from, to which she responded she had bought them in Target.

While some suggested the issue wasn’t really a swimwear one, but a fed-up local taking aim at a tourist.

“Plenty of people wear bikinis smaller than yours, it’s because you’re a tourist,” one commenter said.

“I grew up in Hawaii and that is an extremely modest bikini compared to what the girls in my high school would wear,” another agreed.

“We really just don’t like tourists but this is wrong as a local, I am sorry. The local girls here wear the exact same,” another wrote.

Continue the conversation @RebekahScanlan | rebekah.scanlan@news.com.au





Source link

Woman gets cruel note in McDonald’s order from delivery driver


A US woman was shocked after finding a note telling her to “lose weight” in her McDonald’s order.

Suzie, who goes by @soozieque on TikTok, shared a video this week explaining her DoorDash driver had left a note in her McDonald’s bag.

“Lose weight, ask me how,” the note read.

It was written on a card for Herbalife Nutrition, a dietary supplement company that generates revenue through multi-level marketing (MLM), also known as a pyramid scheme.

“My DoorDash person put this in my McDonald’s bag,” Suzie wrote on TikTok, adding in a caption, “Thanks … I guess.”

The video has been viewed more than 65,000 times, and caused a stir on the social media platform with many commenters calling the delivery driver unprofessional.

RELATED: Controversial video of vegan mum’s baby

RELATED:Forgotten Macca’s item Aussies want back

Many urged Suzie to report the driver, to which she said she “tried” and “heard nothing”.

News.com.au has contacted DoorDash for a comment.

“That’s messed up,” one woman said.

“That’s mad rude,” another said.

“File a complaint with DoorDash,” another urged.

“Imagine if he had given that to someone suffering from an ed (eating disorder),” another wrote.

But some commenters urged Suzie not to take it personally, and suggested the delivery driver was trying to bootstrap his own career.

“People on their hustle and flow. Some people are so sensitive on everything,” Tonyia Hopper wrote.

“I’m sure she’s just trying to sell her products.”

“I think this person was just trying to give you their business card,” another agreed.

“No harm. People are out of work rn.”



Source link